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Introducing the Dean’s Bookshelf

Introducing the Dean’s Bookshelf

We learn a lot about people by sharing books that are meaningful. To help us get to know one another, I have donated a selection of books, including fiction, nonfiction, poetry and children’s books, to create the “Dean’s Bookshelf.” The books usually either address timely issues in medicine or are books that I have personally enjoyed. By reading these books, you can get to know the field of medicine and me a little better. I hope sharing books will become a tradition in the College of Medicine.

Tackling the opioid epidemic in rural America

Tackling the opioid epidemic in rural America

I am always on the lookout for real-life physician heroes; they inspire me personally and professionally. Today I am sharing a compelling story about Dr. Nicole Gastala, a family physician in rural Iowa who is folding addiction treatment into an already busy family medicine practice. She felt the personal responsibility to step up and meet the medical needs of her patients. As a physician, will you do the work others might shy away from?

Match Day: The next leg of the journey

Match Day: The next leg of the journey

Today is Match Day, the culmination of months of interviews and for some, sleepless nights weighing match lists. Match Day is filled with anxiety for most students and also for your families, friends, and especially your teachers, all of whom want the best for you. There are challenges with the Match process, but ultimately, the match does one thing and it does it effectively and efficiently. The Match determines where, specifically the geographic location and institution, you will make one of the biggest transitions of your lives.

The Blurred Lines Between Doctors and Patients

The Blurred Lines Between Doctors and Patients

Today is Valentine’s Day. It always reminds me of times when doctors become patients yet still are doctors. My son, my first child, was born on Valentine’s Day. I was a first-year attending physician. I was in labor as I completed my rounds and consults for that day. I was in pain when I checked out to the physician who would take over for me. It was uncomfortable for me as I ended my clinical duty, physically and also emotionally. I was blurring the line between physician and patient.

Remembering “L” as we prepare for the Cadaver Memorial

Remembering “L” as we prepare for the Cadaver Memorial

I received my invitation to the class of 2021 cadaver memorial last week. The cadaver memorial is a tradition amongst the Texas A&M College of Medicine students as they complete their anatomy class. The memorial honors the individuals who donated their bodies so that the medical students could learn human anatomy, the foundation for the practice of medicine. The cadaver memorial is a clear manifestation of our Aggie values, especially the value of respect.

The invitation made me think about my own experience as a young medical student.